Category Archives: Hot Tub Safety

Beware the Man-eating Hot Tub Cover

How dangerous is an overweight foam hot tub cover? Recently a man was checking the chemicals in his spa. Rather than attempting removing the entire hot tub cover, he decided to just lift one side enough to get at the water long enough to get a sample. He bent over and supporting the heavy cover with his left arm while attempting to fill a sampling bottle with water from the spa to check the chemical content, and total alkalinity.

As he leaned over further, the weight of the water logged spa cover dislocated his left shoulder and allowed the cover to hit him on the back knocking him into the spa. He was now face down in the spa with his legs pinned to spa by the weight of the hot tub cover. His shoulder was dislocated and unlike the Mel Gibson character in Lethal Weapon, he was in agony because of a the pain. He tried to move but could not budge the weight of the waterlogged cover.

He began to choke as he swallowed spa water and tried to rise up but could barely get his head out of the water. With what could have been his last breath, he screamed for help. Fortunately he had left the door from the house to the deck open. His daughter and her boy friend heard the commotion and looked out to see his legs sticking out of the spa cover.

His daughter and her boy friend were able to lift the hot tub cover off of his legs. His daughters boy friend jumped into the hot tub and pulled him up from the water. They took him to the emergency room where they put his shoulder back in place and treated him for shock.

Women who have experienced both child birth and a dislocated shoulder report dislocating a shoulder as more intense than childbirth. But either way we can agree the pain must be excruciating.

This man had owned a hot tub for 12 years and had replaced 3 conventional rigid foam core spa covers. While the life on the foam covers had averaged from 2 to 4 years, regardless of manufactures claims, all of these traditional foam filled covers became waterlogged. He has since bought a Spa Cover that uses air chambers to insulate rather than rigid foam. He is certain that the air filled spa cover will not try to kill him as the other foam cover did.

Another lady reported that while she and her husband were in the hot tub with their rigid foam spa lid propped up against the wall. A gust of wind hit the spa cover and it suddenly fell hitting her husband on the head. The blow was hard enough to push them both under the water. Fortunately they were not trapped and they both recovered quickly, or so they thought.

A couple of days later the left side of her husbands face suddenly went DEAD. He had no feeling, sensation or movement. Naturally they both were quite frightened and thought he had suffered a stroke. They did exactly what any of us would do and rushed immediately to the hospital. The doctor diagnosed him with Bells Palsy which can be caused by stress and or trauma like a heavy spa cover hitting him on the head. He later made a full recovery. He was extremely lucky.

Here is something you will never hear from a foam spa cover dealer. Every year people are injured by foam hot tub covers. Most of the injuries have come from a gust of wind blowing the heavy foam cover onto people as they use their spa. Sometimes people attempting to carefully maneuver a saturated foam cover off their spa, have lost their grip and had the hard foam cover slam down breaking the arch of their foot.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission people have even been drowned when they have become trapped under heavy foam covers. Maybe now is a good time to search for a better spa cover. With the World Wide Web, you can literally have the world to shop from. Do you really want to risk injury or death trying to use your spa?

Although the video above may look humorous it is not funny when it happens. In thirty years of building air filled hot tub covers, no one has ever been injured by a SpaCap hot tub cover.

Hot Tub Water Temperature – SpaCap

If you own a hot tub you already know how great it is, all the health benefits and reasons to use it. However, you want your spa to be comfortable and safe for your family and guests. Today we hope to cover the most optimal temperature for your spa water.


Most hot tubs at hotels and other places open to the public are set at a standard of 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Residential hot tubs typically come set between 100 to 102 degrees.


Naturally, it is largely a matter of personal preference and there will always be others who want their water hotter or colder.


People interested in saving money on their power bill during the winter months, may want to set their hot tub to a lower setting since the weather outside will typically be colder and make the water feel plenty warm.

Those that use the hot tub for therapy may require a higher setting. In those instances you can raise it to 104 degrees which is the highest setting for any new spa commercially available. This is in accordance with the National Spa and Pool Institute’s finding that 104 has been determined as the highest safe water temperature for healthy adults.


Most hot tubs intended for home use allow for a water temperature setting between 80 and 102 degrees. But what feels comfortable to one person may seem unbearably hot to another. Although you may feel that the temperature setting on your hot tub is a matter of personal preference, there are some physical signs that our bodies send us to be aware of. Below are a few of the ways our body lets us know that we may be getting too hot along with the problem if you don’t pay attention.


  • Lower heart rate. Like many things this is one that sneaks up on us because relaxation itself will cause your heart rate to slow down. The problem is that for some people, the heart rate slowing down too much can be deadly. The warm water of the hot tub will slow your heart rate as you relax and your blood vessels dilate. If for any reason you start to feel light headed or you notice someone else showing signs of it, it’s time to get out of the spa and cool down.


  • Vasodilation. As I mentioned above the hot water will cause blood vessels to open up, especially those close to your skin. Although great for increasing blood flow to extremities and for decreasing blood pressure, it too can be a problem. People suffering from heart problems or chronic low blood pressure should be careful to limit the time they spend in the hot tub. If it’s your hot tub and you want to be able to spend a longer time soaking, this would be one of those times setting the water temperature lower would be a good idea.


  • Dehydration. Actually this one is way more common than you might think. Especially among those of us that think the hot tub is a perfect place to enjoy an adult beverage. While you’re enjoying the soothing sensations of the hot spa water you’re sweating. We just don’t realize it because we’re sitting in the warm water. Plus, and this one is even harder to wrap your head around, our skin is drying out. You’re becoming dehydrated while you’re sitting in hot water. Crazy right? But it’s not a joke. If you don’t keep hydrated (and no alcoholic beverages don’t count, in fact they make it worse) you could end up with a headache or some other more serious effect of dehydration. So for the safety and well being of yourself and your guests keep drinking plenty of water, before and during your time in the hot tub. Save the adult beverages for after your spa time.


It would be irresponsible of us not to mention that if you are concerned about heart complications or any other health risks, it would always be better to consult your physician. Maybe the doctor can suggest a safe hot tub temperature for you.


We want everyone using a hot tub to be safe which is one of the reasons behind the design of our lightweight hot tub covers.


Years ago when we would travel to home shows all over the country, in our display we would have a video set up showing an actor being injured by a heavy foam cover slamming down on them. It would run continuously during the home show. Eventually, invariably a visitor to our booth would tell us that it had happened to them.


Heavy hot tub covers can be a more than just annoying, they can be a serious hazard. That’s why the covers we build at don’t use foam panels like the typical rigid hot tub covers. We use air chambers to do the insulating instead. Aside from being more efficient, the air chambers don’t suck up moisture like every foam-filled cover ever made.


Why not order a custom SpaCap spa cover for your hot tub today and save yourself the aggravation of wrestling a heavy cover.

Hot Tub Safety: Keeping Safe Around the Hot Tub – SpaCap

The hot tub is meant to be safe and relaxing, particularly during stressful seasons like the holidays. Unfortunately, hot tubs also come with unique safety issues owners should be aware of before opening the tub to guests. Fall and winter are particularly uncertain times for hot tub users because increased rain and colder weather may make the hot tub area slippery, icy, or at the least, unpleasantly cold. SpaCap has provided a few tips to make sure colder weather doesn’t mean you must close the hot tub altogether.

Stay Sanitary

Unsanitary hot tubs lead to rashes, ear infections, yeast infections, and other illnesses. Guests who have recently experienced colds or the flu can easily spread germs in the hot tub even if they’ve been well for several days. To avoid illness and infection, always keep hot tub sanitizer handy and check sanitizer levels frequently. Close the hot tub to check the water’s pH balance at least once a week. Keep spa cleaners and other chemicals out of direct sunlight and out of children’s reach, and never mix them before pouring them into the tub. Encourage guests to shower or bathe before entering and after exiting the hot tub.

Don’t Drink and Swim

Drinking in the hot tub can be as dangerous as drinking and driving. Hot water increases the effects of alcohol and various drugs or medications. If you are on potent meds, consult your doctor about whether a hot tub is safe. Never mix medication and alcohol, and do not drink while in the hot tub. A good alternative to alcohol is a chilled mocktail, juice, or soda – the cold drink will entice you to enjoy the hot water more.

No Babies on Board

Pregnant women should not use hot tubs because the extreme water temperatures and chemicals, as well as prolonged exposure, may harm the fetus. Infants should never be placed in a hot tub, as they could drown even with a parent nearby.

Slips, Slides, and More

Since the area around a hot tub is wet, people are likely to slip or trip no matter how careful you are. This is where a little attention to how the area around your spa is laid out can make a big difference when it comes to safety.

If possible, outfit your tub with railings or easy steps to help people get in and out more safely. I’m not a big fan of having a handrail that goes into the water but there are some really nice alternatives available. Some that mount onto the spa cabinet of a set of stairs next to it. Giving your self and your guests a good hand hold getting in and out of the spa can be really helpful.

Another place for a handrail would be on the way to and from the hot tub. If you live in an area that gets a lot of ice and snow I would even consider putting one up around the spa to make it easy to walk around the hot tub in any conditions.

Encourage guests to wear shoes until they enter the tub. If conditions are icy clear the snow and throw down some deicer to give your guests good footing to and from the spa. Naturally, you don’t want any of the deicer to end up in the spa so having a way for them to sit and take off their shoes before entering the spa is a must.

Also, tell guests with long hair to pull it back before entering the tub. Long hair can get caught in the drain or drain cover if adults duck underwater. Children should never be allowed to play underwater in the hot tub.

A Heavy Cover can be dangerous. If your hot tub cover has become more than one person can safely handle, it’s time to replace it with something better. At we specialize in Hot Tub Covers that are lightweight and easy to use. Order one for your spa today before you hurt yourself.
Hot Tub Relaxing

Inground vs. Above Ground Hot Tub – SpaCap

One of the biggest decisions consumers are faced with when purchasing and installing  a hot tub is whether to go with an in-ground or above-ground, free standing solution. Price alone often dictates the decision, but other factors come into play. You don’t want to install a permanent hot tub only to find you aren’t using it a year later. The following are a few factors to consider when looking into buying a hot tub.


  • Permanence and portability. If you know you want a hot tub on your property for as long as you live there and you want to build a hot tub to add to your home’s property hot tub and poolvalue, choose an in-ground tub. However, if you are unsure of where you want your hot tub to go or of how long you plan on keeping it, opt for an above-ground tub. They are portable and can be sold whenever the owner wishes without any major changes having to be made to the yard or patio.


  • Cost. In-ground hot tubs cost more to install, but may add value to your home’s property value if or when you choose to move. They are also more expensive to maintain. However, if you are installing an in-ground pool, adding on a hot tub will be much more economical and easier.


  • Aesthetics. A major benefit of in-ground pools and hot tubs is that they are low profile and blend into the ground. Above ground hot tubs, on the other hand, are large and bulky and stand out in the yard, patio, or porch. In-ground hot tubs also give the illusion of taking up less space.


  • Safety. From a purely analytical view point, free standing above ground spas have fewer accidental drownings. If you want to go with an in-ground installation, leaving the edge of the spa bench high, (sixteen to eighteen inches above the deck surface) greatly reduces the risk. Plus it makes it convenient for users to approach, sit down and enter the spa.


If you are considering installing a hot tub in your yard or on your porch, talk with a contractor and discuss all of your options, taking into account the features listed here. No matter how you install your new hot tub you’ll need a great cover to go with it. At we have been custom building great Hot Tub Covers  for years.  We would love to build one for you.

Winter Hot Tub Fun – SpaCap

Hot tubs are traditionally associated with summer, but the fun doesn’t have to end once winter arrives. In fact, winter can be a great time to uncover the hot tub again – especially because hot water is an irresistible temptation once the temperature drops. However, there are a few crucial things you need to know about upkeep if you’re going to keep your hot tub open during cold weather. Read on for a few tips for making your hot tub a hot spot this winter.

Level Out

Chlorine and pH levels always need to be checked, but more so during the winter. Winter is cold and flu season, so all kinds of germs are rampant. Check your pH and chlorine levels at least twice daily to ensure any microorganisms are eliminated. Require guests and family members to bathe or shower before using the hot tub, and don’t open the tub on days when it’s freezing or below. Anyone who is ill or recovering from an illness should stay out of the tub.

Clear the Way

Trekking to the hot tub can be dangerous if there’s snow on the ground or your hot tub area is slippery from rain. Always clear an easily accessible path to the hot tub, and don’t go out alone. Children and teens especially should not be out unsupervised. Encourage guests to wear shoes until they actually reach the hot tub area and remove them just before entering the tub.

Invest in a Towel Warmer

Swimsuits hold water against the body, which is one reason why you feel cold after stepping out of a hot tub. Further, when leaving the tub, your body temperature naturally drops. To ensure your guests don’t freeze, install a towel warmer in or near the hot tub area. This will encourage guests not to hurry through the hot tub experience. As a bonus, a warm towel may give more incentive to shower or bathe after use.

Don’t Forget the Cover

One crucial factor that can really dampen your enjoyment is attempting to get a heavy, frozen hot tub cover off and back onto the spa. Traditional rigid foam filled Hot Tub Covers will always end up saturated and that water inside the foam cover will freeze essentially you’ll end up with a block of ice over your spa. Not to mention that moving a heavy cover when there can be ice around the hot tub can be dangerous. Avoid the hassle by visiting and ordering a custom made, lightweight hot tub covers that won’t get heavy or break.

Dos and Don’ts for the Hot Tub – SpaCap

A Spa or Hot tub can be fun for people of all ages and backgrounds. However, there are a few simple rules users should follow to stay safe and have a good time. The following is a list of rules to keep in mind while enjoying your spa experience.


  • Don’t assume your hot tub is low maintenance. Always check the chemicals in your tub every other week.
  • Don’t forget to rehydrate if you stay in the spa for a prolonged period of time.
  • Don’t get into a hot tub while pregnant.
  • Don’t drink or eat out of glass in your spa. It’s a mess to clean up if broken.
  • Don’t let debris get in your tub. Sand and dirt can mess up a filter.
  • Don’t get into a hot tub with an open wound. Hot tubs can facilitate the spread of infection.
  • Don’t get into a hot tub if the temperature is higher than 104oF.
  • Don’t jump into a spa.
  • Don’t use a hot tub during a storm.
  • Don’t mess with the electrical box. Only a technician can service the parts in the box.



  • Use your hot tub to strengthen your romantic relationship. The hot tub is an ideal place for reconnecting and relaxing together.
  • Closely monitor children around hot tubs.
  • Ensure your spa is properly enclosed for safety and liability reasons.
  • Mix with alcohol or medications carefully. Alcohol can raise your body temperature and make you dehydrate faster, which could be dangerous. Some medications should not be mixed with extremely hot water.
  • Pull up long hair to keep it from being caught in a filter or drain.
  • Be careful with electricity. Only use battery-operated appliances near the spa water.
  • Use a quality cover to protect the heat and safety of the hot tub water.

And that’s something we happen to know something about at Check it out, we have been building Hot Tub Covers for two generations. Our covers are in use all over the world from the Alps to the Virgin Islands. Even in Tornado Alley these covers can stand up to more than any rigid foam filled cover ever could. Order yours today at


Enjoying a dip in the spa
Spa Rules


Don’t Drink and Hot Tub – SpaCap

There are two things people are reminded to do when going on summer vacation: wait 30 minutes after eating to swim, and don’t drink in the hot tub. Waiting 30 minutes after eating to swim is usually a good idea, but it’s not normally a life-saving tip. Mixing alcohol with a hot tub, however, is something that can’t be ignored. The following are several reasons to stay away from drinking while hot tubbing.

• Dehydration. Hot tubbing causes you to sweat, though you probably won’t realize it, and sweating will dehydrate you. Alcohol also causes you to dehydrate, compounding the effects of the hot tub and increasing the influence alcohol has on your body. This means you can get drunk more quickly, which could be very dangerous.

• Heat exhaustion. Most veteran hot tubbers know the slightly light-headed feeling of staying in the hot tub for too long, and most drinkers have experienced the phenomenon of alcohol increasing body temperature. Combining these two produces heat stress that your body may not be equipped to handle, which could lead to weakness, nausea, dizziness, fainting, rapid pulse, or worse.

• Drowning. A person can drown in less than a foot of water, and if they have been drinking, their lack of inhibitions can lead to stupid and wild behavior. Harmless horseplay be much while sober can more dangerous when alcohol is involved. Furthermore, combining the relaxing effects of the hot tub and the alcohol can cause a person to pass out or fall asleep, and if they sink below the surface of the water, they might not come back up.

Enjoying a beer or a glass of wine while in the hot tub is a fun and pleasant experience. However, if you decide that you want to drink in your hot tub, be very careful and make sure to not overdo it.

Something else to avoid when it comes to your hot tub is a heavy cover. Back in the day when we were still traveling around doing home shows , we used to have a video playing that showed an actor being injured by a heavy hot tub cover. Everywhere we showed it someone would say, “Hey, that happened to me!” It’s not funny when it happens to you. In fact it can be deadly. Besides that, if your cover is too heavy to lift you’re not going to get into the spa as often which is tragic.

Heavy Hot Tub Covers keep people out of the spa
If your cover looks like this you’re probably not using the hot tub today

Don’t let a heavy hot tub cover keep you from getting into your spa. Check out the only hot tub covers that don’t break or get saturated at

Hot Tubs and High Blood Pressure – SpaCap

People with high blood pressure will often avoid lulling in a hot tub because they think it’s not good for them. Even though hot tubs can pose health risks for anyone if misused or overused, they are great for improving overall circulation. Here are some misconceptions about hot tubs and some facts regarding hot tub safety:

  • Hot tubs are dangerous for high blood pressure sufferers. Hot tubs and saunas expose the body to high heat, which widens blood vessels near the surface of the skin. This process is known as vasodilation and can sometimes cause a slight drop in blood pressure, though never enough to cause worry. If users want to avoid the blood pressure drop, they should enter the hot tub slowly to allow their body to become accustomed to the new temperature.
  • You should not go from a hot tub to cold water. One activity that young people sometimes enjoy is soaking in a hot tub and jumping in a cold pool immediately afterwards. This can pose a slight risk to people with blood pressure problems; the rapid change in temperature will cause stress and rapid blood pressure changes in the body. Sufferers of hypertension should be careful to slowly allow their body to adjust to any temperature changes.
  • Hot tubs are bad for heart patients. Hot tubs can pose some risks for heart patients, but nothing so severe that they can’t enjoy a brief dip in a hot tub. The increase in body temperature can lower blood pressure and widen blood vessels, which can have negative effects on the heart if continued for a long time. Heart patients and those taking heart medications should talk with their doctors before relaxing in a hot tub, stay hydrated, and keep their sessions brief.
  • Hot tubs affect pacemakers. No link has been found between hot tubs and pacemaker problems. However, since most people with pacemakers have a history of heart problems, they should be cautious when using a hot tub and give themselves time to adjust to the water temperature.
  • Hot tubs cause dizziness and headaches. If a person is in a hot tub for too long, he or she may suffer dizziness, headaches, or shortness of breath. These symptoms are temporary, but a person experiencing them should take a break until the symptoms abate.

One thing that we should all avoid is overexertion from lifting a heavy hot tub cover. If you want to lift weights, go to the gym. If you want to get into your hot tub to relax you shouldn’t have to strain yourself lifting an obsolete, over weight foam hot tub cover.

At, we have been building the next generation of Hot Tub Covers for a generation. Check out our custom made, lightweight hot tub covers today and stop killing yourself trying to get your therapy.

Hot Tub Accessories for Safety and Fun

From the fun to the functional, what’s a hot tub without accessories? Whether it’s aromatherapy to enhance your hot tub experience or hammocks to encourage relaxation, the options are limitless. Let’s dive in and take a look at some of the top hot tub accessories you never knew you needed.

Accessories You Need

Make your hot tub a more enjoyable investment by adding the following accessories to your collection:


  • Pillows and cushions.Your hot tub is supposed to be comfortable and relaxing, right? Well, that isn’t always the case after soaking for a few minutes. The hard seats and backing can be uncomfortable and often forces you to cut your time short. Thanks to spa pillows and cushions, you can sit comfortably for as long as you like.


  • Floating speakers. Who doesn’t love to listen to a little music while they relax in the hot tub? Unfortunately, it’s often difficult to operate an iPod or sound system near water. The solution? Floating speakers that are safe, waterproof, and sound great.


  • Spa fragrances.Love your hot tub but not a big fan of the chlorine smell? Spa fragrances are becoming quite popular and can be added to the water for a soothing, relaxing, and invigorating experience. Some fragrances are great for moisturizing the skin.


  • Spa steps. Safety should always be a consideration with your hot tub. For elderly adults and people with mobility issues, climbing up into the hot tub can be dangerous and precarious. Thankfully, there are products that make it easier and safer. Consider purchasing spa steps to reduce the likelihood of falls and other related injuries.


In addition to these four accessories, consider a replacement hot tub cover that will make owning your spa even better, the Next Generation of Spa Cover: SpaCap. This revolutionary cover is easy to remove, doesn’t break or saturate, never flies away, and stands up against the elements – including snow. For more information, visit

Hot Tub Safety

A hot tub or spa is a great way to relax, allowing the jets to soothe sore muscles and the warmth to envelop you. In particular, spa use during the winter months is one of the most enjoyable seasons for submerging the body in warm water. Read on for more information about Hot Tub Safety for all hot tub users.


The most common hazard of hot tubs, according to the CPSC, is drowning. Around 20% of drownings occur with children under five years old.


  • What to do: Hot tub owners should always keep the hot tub covered with a lockable  cover when it’s not being used. Always keep kids away from the hot tub when an adult is not available to supervise.


  •  Use a light weight cover: As odd as it sounds many Hot tub owners are injured or drowned under a heavy cover. When a typical foam cover becomes too much of a hassle to remove all the way off the spa, many owners just lean it back against a nearby wall. Unfortunately when the cover falls back onto the spa unexpectedly an injury to the head or neck can occur and in some instances cause drowning. This has never occurred even once in the last thirty years with a SpaCap air filled Hot Tub Cover.

Hair entanglement is another safety hazard. This happens when a hot tub user’s hair is sucked into the spa’s suction fitting, or is entrapped by the drain cover while water is drawn in. As a result, the CSPC has developed a standard for drain covers to reduce this risk; still, hot tub users should ensure safety.


  • What to do: Make sure your spa has proper drains and drain covers approved by updated security standards. Bathers with longer locks should always tie their hair up to further reduce the risk.


Many deaths have occurred as a result of water that is too hot. A high temperature can make you drowsy, which can result in falling asleep or passing out.


  • What to do: Keep the temperature of your hot tub at 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius) or less. If you are a pregnant woman, stay out of the heat, and be sure to keep kids under five away from hot water as well.


Finally, adults who drink alcohol while using a hot tub put themselves at major risk. Alcohol causes dehydration, which combined with the tub’s heat can lead to light-headedness, nausea, confusion, dizziness, and in the worst cases, coma or death.


  • What to do: Don’t drink before or during use of your spa.


By following the above tips when using your hot tub, you’ll ensure a safer, more relaxing time for all participants.