Hot Tub Safety: Keeping Safe Around the Hot Tub – SpaCap

The hot tub is meant to be safe and relaxing, particularly during stressful seasons like the holidays. Unfortunately, hot tubs also come with unique safety issues owners should be aware of before opening the tub to guests. Fall and winter are particularly uncertain times for hot tub users because increased rain and colder weather may make the hot tub area slippery, icy, or at the least, unpleasantly cold. SpaCap has provided a few tips to make sure colder weather doesn’t mean you must close the hot tub altogether.

Stay Sanitary

Unsanitary hot tubs lead to rashes, ear infections, yeast infections, and other illnesses. Guests who have recently experienced colds or the flu can easily spread germs in the hot tub even if they’ve been well for several days. To avoid illness and infection, always keep hot tub sanitizer handy and check sanitizer levels frequently. Close the hot tub to check the water’s pH balance at least once a week. Keep spa cleaners and other chemicals out of direct sunlight and out of children’s reach, and never mix them before pouring them into the tub. Encourage guests to shower or bathe before entering and after exiting the hot tub.

Don’t Drink and Swim

Drinking in the hot tub can be as dangerous as drinking and driving. Hot water increases the effects of alcohol and various drugs or medications. If you are on potent meds, consult your doctor about whether a hot tub is safe. Never mix medication and alcohol, and do not drink while in the hot tub. A good alternative to alcohol is a chilled mocktail, juice, or soda – the cold drink will entice you to enjoy the hot water more.

No Babies on Board

Pregnant women should not use hot tubs because the extreme water temperatures and chemicals, as well as prolonged exposure, may harm the fetus. Infants should never be placed in a hot tub, as they could drown even with a parent nearby.

Slips, Slides, and More

Since the area around a hot tub is wet, people are likely to slip or trip no matter how careful you are. This is where a little attention to how the area around your spa is laid out can make a big difference when it comes to safety.

If possible, outfit your tub with railings or easy steps to help people get in and out more safely. I’m not a big fan of having a handrail that goes into the water but there are some really nice alternatives available. Some that mount onto the spa cabinet of a set of stairs next to it. Giving your self and your guests a good hand hold getting in and out of the spa can be really helpful.

Another place for a handrail would be on the way to and from the hot tub. If you live in an area that gets a lot of ice and snow I would even consider putting one up around the spa to make it easy to walk around the hot tub in any conditions.

Encourage guests to wear shoes until they enter the tub. If conditions are icy clear the snow and throw down some deicer to give your guests good footing to and from the spa. Naturally, you don’t want any of the deicer to end up in the spa so having a way for them to sit and take off their shoes before entering the spa is a must.

Also, tell guests with long hair to pull it back before entering the tub. Long hair can get caught in the drain or drain cover if adults duck underwater. Children should never be allowed to play underwater in the hot tub.

A Heavy Cover can be dangerous. If your hot tub cover has become more than one person can safely handle, it’s time to replace it with something better. At we specialize in Hot Tub Covers that are lightweight and easy to use. Order one for your spa today before you hurt yourself.
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