Hot Tub Safety

A hot tub or spa is a great way to relax, allowing the jets to soothe sore muscles and the warmth to envelop you. In particular, spa use during the winter months is one of the most enjoyable seasons for submerging the body in warm water. Read on for more information about Hot Tub Safety for all hot tub users.


The most common hazard of hot tubs, according to the CPSC, is drowning. Around 20% of drownings occur with children under five years old.


  • What to do: Hot tub owners should always keep the hot tub covered with a lockable  cover when it’s not being used. Always keep kids away from the hot tub when an adult is not available to supervise.


  •  Use a light weight cover: As odd as it sounds many Hot tub owners are injured or drowned under a heavy cover. When a typical foam cover becomes too much of a hassle to remove all the way off the spa, many owners just lean it back against a nearby wall. Unfortunately when the cover falls back onto the spa unexpectedly an injury to the head or neck can occur and in some instances cause drowning. This has never occurred even once in the last thirty years with a SpaCap air filled Hot Tub Cover.

Hair entanglement is another safety hazard. This happens when a hot tub user’s hair is sucked into the spa’s suction fitting, or is entrapped by the drain cover while water is drawn in. As a result, the CSPC has developed a standard for drain covers to reduce this risk; still, hot tub users should ensure safety.


  • What to do: Make sure your spa has proper drains and drain covers approved by updated security standards. Bathers with longer locks should always tie their hair up to further reduce the risk.


Many deaths have occurred as a result of water that is too hot. A high temperature can make you drowsy, which can result in falling asleep or passing out.


  • What to do: Keep the temperature of your hot tub at 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius) or less. If you are a pregnant woman, stay out of the heat, and be sure to keep kids under five away from hot water as well.


Finally, adults who drink alcohol while using a hot tub put themselves at major risk. Alcohol causes dehydration, which combined with the tub’s heat can lead to light-headedness, nausea, confusion, dizziness, and in the worst cases, coma or death.


  • What to do: Don’t drink before or during use of your spa.


By following the above tips when using your hot tub, you’ll ensure a safer, more relaxing time for all participants.